Overview

Click on the title of the publication in the overview or browse through the summaries below

System change


Market Systems Development


Vocational Skills Development


Results Measurement


Practitioners’ Notes  [2018]

The authors, Aly Miehlbradt and Hans Posthumus, conducted a training workshop with advanced practitioners in November 2017. The content for the 5 Practitioners’ Notes emerged from the presentations and discussions during the workshop.

1    Gathering Information from Businesses; tips and challenges [2018]

2    Technology in results measurement; pros and cons [2018]

3    Monitoring: tips to ensure an effective integrated monitoring function [2018]

4    Using multipliers to estimate impact; tips when and how to develop and use [2018]

5    Assessing systemic change; tips to outline and assess system change [2018]


Ten typical challenges in results measurement [2015]


These publications have been developed by the HPC consortium in collaboration with programs around the world. The consortium was led by Hans Posthumus and consisted of Aly Miehlbradt (MCL), Ben Fowler (MSA), Mihaela Balan, Nabanita Sen (OU), Phitcha Wanitphon and Wafa Hafiz (H&S).

 1    Measuring Attribution: a practical framework to select appropriate attribution methods [2015]

     1.1 Measuring Attribution: MDF in East Timor using the Before and After Comparison Method for the Acelda intervention [2015]

    1.2 Measuring Attribution: Samarth NMDP in Nepal using the Quasi Experimental Design Method for an intervention in the Ginger Sector [2015]

    1.3 Measuring Attribution: Propcom Mai-karfi in Nigeria using the Comparison Group Method for an intervention in the Tractor Sector [2015]

    1.4 Measuring Attribution: ALCP in Georgia undertaking a sector impact assessment  [2015]

2    Measuring Systemic Change – The case of GEMS1 in Nigeria [2015]

3    Building a Learning Culture – The case of the Market Development Facility in Fiji [2015]

4    Monitoring Program Progress. the case of Making Markets Work for the Jamuna, Padma and Teesta Chars (M4C) in Bangladesh [2015]

5    Measuring Sustainability: the case of Kenya Markets Trust in Kenya [2015]

6    Developing a Program Specific Monitoring and Results Measurement Manual [2015]

7    Measuring the impact of interventions designed to improve the Business Enabling Environment: the case of GEMS|3 in Nigeria [2015]

8    Using Information on Results in Program Management: the case of Samarth-NMDP in Nepal [2015]

9    Applying the DCED Standard to an Environmental Project: the case of EcoVecindarios in Bolivia  [2015]

10  Achieving changes in markets: the MDF framework for defining and populating pathways for systemic change [2015]

 
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January 2022

Highlights and Tips from Practice

For a pragmatic approach to system change

This slide deck complements the A pragmatic approach to assessing system change papers, outlining a process that programmes can apply to regularly and practically assess system change.

The slides highlight the most critical elements of assessing system change and provide practical tips on how to start applying the pragmatic approach to:

  • develop system strategies

  • apply the helicopter lens to assess changes

  • review changes and revise system strategies

 
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June 2021

VSD and PSE: forming partnerships with the private sector

First, a few conceptual frameworks are introduced to clarify some concepts such as Vocational Skills Development and Private Sector Engagement.


Secondly, tips are provided on how to form partnerships in light of Private Sector Engagement followed with a few examples to inspire creativity.


Thirdly, tips are provided on how to form partnerships in light of VET institutions and VSD programs, followed with tips for partnerships to assess Labour Needs, Developing Training Content and Work Based Learning.


Last not least, references to programs and other publications are provided


 
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2020

A Pragmatic Approach to Assessing System Change

The approach described in these papers helps programs to structure strategies and intervention plans so that they better guide program management and assessment of system change. The approach also introduces the intervention lens and the helicopter lens for assessing system changes. By enabling programs to pragmatically identify and assess system changes regularly, the approach equips programs to improve their strategies and interventions more effectively and quickly. There is one short overview-paper and one detailed How- to-put-it--into practice - paper.

Hans Posthumus, Rachel Shah ( Springfield Centre), Alexandra Miehlbradt (MCL) , Adam Kessler (DCED)


 
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March 2020

Skills for Jobs: Developing an apprenticeship system

This case study describes how S4J launched and developed an apprenticeship system that meets the requirements of the private sector and describes the results in terms of graduates being more employable. This case also highlights how the program developed an appropriate monitoring system and how the program assesses the impact of this intervention, while dealing with attribution in this challenging context


 
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May 2019

Forming partnerships with private sector actors

A summary of lessons learned by Market Systems Development Practitioners on forming and managing such partnerships.


This document provides practical tips on how to find and contact partners, how to make deals, what to finance and how, what to consider when making contractual arrangements and how to manage partnerships.


 
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April 2019

Building and managing an appropriate results measurement system

Lessons learned by a smaller Market Systems Development Program applying the DCED Standard.

The case study shares the learnings from the Increasing Market Employability

program (IME) to develop and manage  a results measurement system: 

What needs to be done and why it is important for each phase of the Program Management Cycle.

 
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2019

Monitoring and Measuring Results 

Good practices for SDC program managers

This paper provides guidance on good practice with respect to the process, and with respect to the roles and responsibilities of SDC program managers during program design and implementation. This is in order to ensure that projects can, and will effectively use, a monitoring and results measurement system that complies with the DCED Standard.


The paper focuses on the roles and responsibilities of SDC program managers in steering the implementation partners to develop and use an appropriate monitoring and results measurement system. The paper follows the SDC project management cycle and specifies the challenges and tasks for each of the stages of the cycle. 

 

Applying multipliers in tourism: How the PPSE project in Kosovo developed multipliers to report the wider impacts of interventions accessed.

2016

Projects active in the tourism sector often aim to increase the number of tourists and to prolong their stay, thus resulting in “more dollars spent” in the country. The effect of interventions in the tourism sector on other sectors is often not reported, implying that projects under-report their impact. Their project cost-benefit-analysis is thus not correct, as wider benefits are not captured in the equation. Reporting the wider impact can highlight the importance of tourism for the economy, and lead governments to develop more supportive policies.

Multipliers may help to report wider impacts. 

The Promoting Private Sector Employment (PPSE) project has developed multipliers for the tourism sector  in Kosovo. Although the methodology is still in an experimental phase, it appears to be feasible. Other rojects could adapt the source and methodology to report on the wider impacts of their interventions in the

tourism sector.

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Improving national statistics in Kosovo. 
How the PPSE project helped the government improve data collection for the tourism sector

2016

Statistical data is important because it provides information to stakeholders, enabling national and regional governments to develop policies.  Comparable, reliable and accurate data enables evidence-based decision-making.

Kosovo, being a relatively new country, was not yet able to collect reliable statistical data. The PPSE project assisted the Kosovo Agency of Statistics to develop a system to collect information for the tourism sector.

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Gathering Information from Businesses, 2018

Tips on how to start off on the right foot with businesses and how to address challenges in information gathering that arise during implementation.

The authors, Aly Miehlbradt and Hans Posthumus, conducted a training workshop with advanced practitioners in results measurement for private sector development in November 2017. The content for the 5 Practitioners’ Notes emerged from the presentations and discussions during the workshop.

 
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Technology in results measurement, 2018

Pros and cons on device-based data-collection, on-line questionnaires and analyses software to save time and money, improve accuracy and present information more effectively.

The authors, Aly Miehlbradt and Hans Posthumus, conducted a training workshop with advanced practitioners in results measurement for private sector development in November 2017. The content for the 5 Practitioners’ Notes emerged from the presentations and discussions during the workshop.

 
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Monitoring, 2018

 Monitoring is a critical function to inform program improvements in interventions and strategies. However, programs often do not pay enough attention to ensure that staff are monitoring effectively and efficiently. This Practitioners’ Note outlines tips to help programs implement good monitoring practices, ensuring it adds value for managers and helps to avoid common pitfalls. It also addresses issues in outsourcing monitoring and co-facilitators’ monitoring. 

The authors, Aly Miehlbradt and Hans Posthumus, conducted a training workshop with advanced practitioners in results measurement for private sector development in November 2017. The content for the 5 Practitioners’ Notes emerged from the presentations and discussions during the workshop.

 
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Assessing systemic change, 2018

Assessing systemic change is challenging. The state of the practice around assessment of systemic change is
evolving. This Practitioners’ Note describes how practitioners are outlining systemic change pathways,
identifying and assessing systemic changes, analysing the causes of changes and using information on systemic
changes in program management. It highlights new developments and where more experimentation is
needed.

The authors, Aly Miehlbradt and Hans Posthumus, conducted a training workshop with advanced practitioners in results measurement for private sector development in November 2017. The content for the 5 Practitioners’ Notes emerged from the presentations and discussions during the workshop.

 
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Using multipliers, 2018

 Multipliers can be a cost-effective tool to estimate broader impacts such as employment creation. Programs need to validate existing multipliers or need to develop their own sector and context specific multipliers. This Practitioners’ Note aims to assist programs to assess when multipliers may be appropriate to use, how to use existing multipliers and how to develop multipliers. This Practitioners’ Note focuses on the decision-making process; for the more technical aspects, reference is made to other publications and case studies. 

The authors, Aly Miehlbradt and Hans Posthumus, conducted a training workshop with advanced practitioners in results measurement for private sector development in November 2017. The content for the 5 Practitioners’ Notes emerged from the presentations and discussions during the workshop.

 
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Measuring attribution: a practical framework to select appropriate attribution methods, 2015

Measuring impact in private sector development programmes is important but also challenging. This paper provides an overview of the most common attribution methods, and offers guidance on how to select the most appropriate attribution method for the diversity of interventions and their context. The paper also documents how four programmes - ALCP in Georgia, MDF in East Timor, Propcom Mai-Karfi in Nigeria and Samarth-NMDP in Nepal - have selected and implemented four different attribution methods.

Hans Posthumus and Phitcha Wanitphon. This is one of ten cases that have been developed by Hans Posthumus Consultancy. The preparation of these cases was supported by funds from the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), provided through the DCED Trust Fund. 

 
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Measuring Attribution: ALCP in Georgia undertaking a sector impact assessment, 2015

This case is part of a guidance paper that provides an overview of the most common attribution methods and offers guidance on how to select the most appropriate attribution method for the diversity of interventions within their given context. It explains how ALCP assessed their impact in the livestock sector and why ALCP considers this particular attribution method the most appropriate way to assess the impact of their interventions. It also explains how they carried out the measurements.

Hans Posthumus and Phitcha Wanitphon. This is one of ten cases that have been developed by Hans Posthumus Consultancy. The preparation of these cases was supported by funds from the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), provided through the DCED Trust Fund. 

 

CAPSA

Building capacities to analyse sectors, 2004

CAPSA combines Capacitating (CAP) and Sub sector Analyses (SA).

On the one hand CAPSA provides a methodology and instruments for participants to undertake a sub sector analysis, on the other hand, participants are being trained in general aspects of small enterprise development: two different yet complementary objectives.

A thorough Sub Sector Analyses results in a complete picture of the sub sector; how it functions, what the bottlenecks are and what opportunities the sub sector holds. Thereafter, CAPSA assists in designing appropriate interventions that improve the functioning of the actors within that sub sector.


Sub sector analyses are complicated and thus often undertaken by (international) experts.  CAPSA however trains and guides people with limited experience to undertake such an exercise. This greatly improves their ownership of the analysis  and the implementation of the resulting intervention. It avoids possible loss of information and continuity that might occur when outside experts analyse a sub sector whereafter local actors implement the resulting intervention.

The overview paper (9 pages) sketches

what to find in - and how to use - the (175 pages) manual.